ROMICON REVOLA

Sculpture | Visual Art | India

Outdoor and Monumental Sculptures

This gallery contains site-specific sculptures installed between 2006 to 2016.

Highlights:

METAMORPHOSIS | 2016

Metamorphosis is my first truly public sculpture. Although most of my other sculptures are also viewed by thousands of people every day they are located within tech parks and business parks. Cubbon Park, on the other hand, is in the heart of Bangalore city. A beautiful sanctuary that is accessible to people of all age groups and socio-economic backgrounds.
What makes this sculpture special is the fact that it is carved out of a fallen tree trunk sourced from within the park itself. This silver oak tree which was nearly 50 to 60 years old had fallen down during this year’s monsoon. The park director had the foresight not to dispose of it by selling it for its wood but invited me to use it as material for a sculpture. By converting the fallen tree to a sculpture I’m able to ensure that the tree lives on in a new avatar for a few more decades.

Metamorphosis features 70 stainless steel butterflies emerging out of a 25 feet long tree trunk carved to symbolize a giant caterpillar. The butterfly, used as symbol to denote the passage of time, is also a symbol for transformation and evolution since the primitive caterpillar goes through a series of changes and finally transitions to a colourful and beautiful creature. This metamorphosis can be seen an analogy for the evolution of a person, a state or a nation. Such evolution often has many facets - physical or spiritual; scientific or social; economic or educational.

--

WATER  | 2015
SCULPTURE FOR ISDO, GUJARAT

When the Indian Stainless Steel Development Organization of India invited me to propose a sculpture to be exhibited at their trade fair in Ahmedabad I responded by envisioning a sculpture that works not only as an art object but also underlines and celebrates the material itself.
A chance visit to a factory that makes SS utensils and bottles triggered the idea.
The general public cannot differentiate between aluminum, steel, stainless steel and they certainly do not know the difference of benefits of various grades of Stainless Steel.
I had been reading about the ill-effects of storing drinking water in plastic and aluminium bottles for some time. I knew that food-grade 316 SS was one of the best materials to store drinking water in (besides glass and copper). This was the point of departure which led to the creation of a water sculpture composed of hundreds of small bottles made out of Grade 316 Stainless Steel. This piece was exhibited at Mahatma Mandir in Gujarat and engaged with hundreds of visitors over the course of the exhibition. Here I was also referencing various socio-economic issues surrounding drinking water. Perforation allows water to flow through them creating a fountain-like effect and at the same time alludes to wastage and loss.

--

BINARY | 2014

A monumental light sculpture installed at Manyata Embassy Tech Park, Bangalore
The high tech environs of M.E.B.P. inspired a digital sculpture made of Stainless Steel and LED lights. The zeros and ones cut into the skin of the cube represent binary digits. When decoded the sequence of digits gives you the name of the tech park. Standing 10 feet by 10 feet by 10 feet this piece engages with thousands of techies on a daily basis. At night it transforms into an animated cube with dynamic light effects made possible through LED technology.

--

URBANSCAPE | 2013

This work is installed at the Hilton hotel in Bangalore. A tree, a sphere and a hemisphere invoke a sense of the organic in a concrete setting. In a barren space where vegetation is not possible a steel tree is better than no tree at all – this thought was the point of departure for this work. The spheres reference twigs and weaver bird nests while the steel tree is an attempt to make a monument out of a humble natural object.

--

INFINITY | 2012

Infinity is a 20 feet wide installation. It has both reflective as well as matte surfaces. I wanted the upper half to reflect the sky and the lower half to reflect the flowers of the garden where it is placed. The sculpture is a multiplication of only one shape and the open ended structure is meant to allow unlimited multiplications in an endless sequence, invoking a meditative character while conveying a sense of infinite possibilities. Here I'm referencing ideas of Oneness, the cyclical nature of human existence and the idea of eternity.

--